Dubbing and Removing spurs on Chickens......

is NOT evidence of Cockfighting

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Why are Rooster Dubbed, and why do you remove their spurs?

There are a number of reasons to Dub a rooster
and to remove his spurs.

I will explain them below.

One reason Roosters are dubbed is because in cold climates they will get frost bit. Pictured are two examples of roosters that are frost bit because their combs were not removed. One of these birds is from Illinois, the other was from Oklahoma. It is much more humane to dub roosters instead of letting them get frost bit. When frost bit they will get gangrene and the comb and wattles will eventually fall off.

Another reason for roosters to be dubbed is for show. It is a breed standard for gamefowl and all must be dubbed if someone is going to show them. This is not unlike someone that is showing a Doberman or a Great Dane having its ears cropped. They wouldnt do very well in a show with floppy ears.



Frost bit comb on gamefowl.
Frost bit comb
Frost bit comb on gamefowl.



Why are a roosters spurs taken off?

There are a number of reasons to take off a roosters spurs.
I am going to mention a few of them here.


Roosters can sometimes get mean. Why leave a spur on that can hurt someone? The spur is pointed and sharp and should be taken off. If a rooster were to hit you with his spur would you want to feel the sharp point, or a short blunt spur? This is just common sense.

The spur is also taken off so the rooster doesnt hurt the hen and leave a sore on her back when the rooster rides the hen.

 

All fowl raised and sold by The Fall Creek Farm are raised for historic reasons, for brood fowl, and show only! We will not sell to anyone that will use the birds for illegal purposes. Any mention on this site about fighting chickens is for historic and educational purposes only. It is your responsibility to abide by all local, state, and federal laws once you receive any birds from us. 2009  Bart Boewe